Tag: EIFF

  • Hellion.

    Hellion is about many things. It is about love, family, victims of circumstance, addiction, loss, masculinity and crime. Directed by Kat Candler, this is one of the most moving films I’ve seen this year. A coming-of-age tale about the tragedy of loving but being unable to provide, Hellion is an absolute triumph. Set in the broken home of […]

  • A Dangerous Game.

    Following the success of You’ve Been Trumped, Anthony Baxter returns to documentary with his follow up. When billionaire, and self described “business extraordinaire”, Donald Trump began to make his dream of building the world’s greatest golf course come true it was the residents of a small area in Aberdeenshire who were made to suffer. Destroying natural preservations […]

  • Let Us Prey.

    Brian O’Malley’s directorial debut is set almost entirely in a small, remote police station. Constable Rachel Heggie is about to begin her first shift, having been relocated; from where? we do not know. Nothing is as it seems in this world. The night begins quietly with two officers having sexual escapades whilst Heggie and her […]

  • Doc of the Dead.

    Alexandre O. Philippe is known for his documentary work that tends to focus of geek-culture. By taking items that are prominent in popular culture and analysing their success and their fandom, he has created several films that excellently discuss the role of the fan and ultimately the rise of the nerds and their interests. In George […]

  • Snowpiercer.

    Set at the end of the year 2021, Snowpiercer tells the story of the planet’s last remaining survivors. All human life now exists on one train, a train organised into rank and social position. Those at the tail-end live in poverty. Those at the front live in luxury, worshipping the sacred engine as well as their mysterious […]

  • A Most Wanted Man.

    Four months after the unexpected death of Philip Seymour Hoffman, one of his final performances is being screened at Edinburgh International Film Festival. An Unwanted Man presents Hoffman as the leader of a secret team, living in Hamburg and fighting the war against terror in dangerous and highly sensitive ways. The film follows a simple plan to […]

  • The Skeleton Twins.

    Life doesn’t always go where you want it to. In reality, not all of the high school bullies end up flipping burgers and not all of their victims end up on Broadway. These sad and painful truths are explored in Craig Johnson’s second feature film, The Skeleton Twins. Siblings Maggie and Milo both contemplate suicide on […]

  • Welcome to New York.

    It’s almost impossible to care about anyone, or anything, in Welcome to New York. Abel Ferrara certainly likes his nasty, corrupted protagonists. From The Driller Killer to Bad Lieutenant, this is the work of a director who’s used to working with the most vicious of lead men. His latest is Mr. Devereaux, a powerful man who works for a […]

  • The Anomaly.

    This is Noel Clarke’s third feature film as a director. Stepping away from the grimy teen violence themes that he is associated with, The Anomaly is much more of a genre piece. Venturing into directing science fiction, Clarke brings us a futuristic thriller about one man’s attempts to figure out his dramatic change in situation, but with only nine minutes until […]

  • Hyena.

    Opening Edinburgh’s 68th International Film Festival is Gerard Johnson’s Hyena, a film that delves into the world of police corruption, oozing with misery and gore. We are first introduced to twisted policeman Michael Logan when he, with his gang of cronies in tow, raids a nightclub. This initial sequences creates a strong sense of what Hyena is all […]