Tag: Edinburgh

  • Journey to the West.

    Made up of what must be less than 15 shots, Journey to the West was a majestic and joyous change from the other films I’ve seen at Edinburgh Film Festival. The film follows a Buddhist monk as he ventures across the city of Marseille, moving at the slowest and smoothest of speeds. Each shot lasts several minutes […]

  • Tony Benn: Will and Testament.

    When Tony Benn died two months ago I was told by many of his greatness. His death brought with it not only mourning for a great man but a grieving for the politics that Britain once had. Too young to remember politics before Blair’s new labour, I am somewhat ignorant as to the way Britain […]

  • Honeymoon.

    A honeymoon in a cottage in the woods. As far as film set ups go, Leigh Janiak’s debut film’s is a promising one. Honeymoon follows newly weds Bea and Paul on their romantic, rustic getaway following their wedding. With no internet or phone signal, they plan to spend their days fishing, making love and playing board games. […]

  • We’ll Never Have Paris.

    Closing Edinburgh International Film Festival is the abysmally limp We’ll Never Have Paris. Attempting to capture the modern tragedy and harsh reality of love and romance, in a Woody Allen inspired way, We’ll Never Have Paris fails to impact. Quinn has grown far too comfortable in his ten year relationship. He is preparing to propose to Devon but […]

  • Set Fire to the Stars.

    Dylan Thomas, the Welsh poet who was glorified for his writing but perhaps made even more famous for his drunken reputation, comes to life in Andy Goddard’s Set Fire to the Stars. Giving this film the label of a biopic does not do it any justice. The film examines the demons that plagued Thomas, those that […]

  • Uncertain Terms.

    “We make bad decisions in love 90% of the time.” These were the words of director Nathan Silver at Edinburgh Film Festival’s Q and A session, following the screening of his latest feature film Uncertain Terms. The director’s words speak volumes and really encapsulate what this moving study of human nature is all about. On the […]

  • Life After Beth.

    Zombies are back and as versatile as ever. Jeff Baena’s Life After Beth demonstrates just how diverse the zombie movie has been able to become in recent years. Balancing both romance and the un-dead, Life After Beth brings a more personable story to life with its ghoulish comedy. We first meet Zach as he enquires about black napkins in his local […]

  • Castles in the Sky.

    Gillies MacKinnon’s Castles in the Sky celebrates the life and work of Robert Watson-Watt; one of history’s most under-appreciated Scotsmen. With his huge contributions to the development of radar, prior to the second world war, Watson-Watt initially seemed like a suitable subject for a BBC 2 sixty-minute single feature. In a Q and A that followed the […]

  • Joe.

    Joe kills trees. He makes his living by poisoning unwanted forests in order for new, stronger pines to be planted in their place. He also employs men to do the same; men that he trusts to work hard and whom he pays fairly. Joe drinks too much and has made enemies in his home town. […]

  • Virunga.

    Documentaries don’t get rawer than Virunga. This is a real story of corruption, greed, death and determination. Amidst tensions over the country’s oil resources as well as a bloody civil war, we meet a select few, determined to protect Congo’s national park known as Virunga. We also encounter some of the last surviving mountain gorillas and those […]