Ethel & Ernest.

The cinematic adaptation of Raymond Briggs’ graphic novel, Ethel & Ernest tells the story of the artist’s parents – their marriage, their lives, their triumphs and tragedies. It opens with a brief interview with Briggs where he briefly describes how he remembers his parents and their relatively undramatic relationship. What follows is the tale of … Continue reading

Suffragette.

Sarah Gavron’s Suffragette explores the rising tension between the equal rights movement, determined to get women the vote, and the government in the early years of the twentieth century. With peaceful protests having gone ignored for too long, Emmeline Pankhurst encourages her foot soldiers to fight with actions instead of words. Maud Watts has worked in … Continue reading

Castles in the Sky.

Gillies MacKinnon’s Castles in the Sky celebrates the life and work of Robert Watson-Watt; one of history’s most under-appreciated Scotsmen. With his huge contributions to the development of radar, prior to the second world war, Watson-Watt initially seemed like a suitable subject for a BBC 2 sixty-minute single feature. In a Q and A that followed the … Continue reading

The Wind Rises.

Hayao Miyazaki’s latest film is hard to review fairly because of our awareness that it is his last – or so he says. For decades, Miyazaki has been animating, directing and writing for cinema and is responsible for some of contemporary cinema’s most moving and philosophical animated films. A master of his specific style of … Continue reading

Downfall.

The story goes like this…Traudl Junge, Hitler’s personal secretary during the last two years of his life, was interviewed for the documentary Blind Spot: Hitler’s Secretary in 2002. After hearing of the documentary’s warm reception and critical success Junge died of cancer in the early hours of the next day. Mere hours before her death, she is … Continue reading