The Disaster Artist.

The Disaster Artist.

Since its release in 2003, Tommy Wiseau’s The Room has gained cult status, becoming a regular favourite among late night audience there to bathe in the absurdity of the whole affair. The stilted awkward delivery of a baffling script combined with the eccentricities of Wiseau’s central character, and a sprawling narrative that drifts from one incomplete story to … Continue reading

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami.

Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami.

An intensely observational documentary, Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami is Sophie Fiennes’ ambitious exploration of the icon and the enigma that is Grace Jones. Combining striking stage performances with more intimate footage of Jones in hotel rooms, dressing rooms and in her native home of Jamaica, Sophie Fiennes’ bold approach to her equally bold subject creates a … Continue reading

Trumbo.

Since the film industry was heinously targeted in the 1950s by Joseph McCarthy and his communist witch hunts, it seems only natural that we would make films about it. The latest in this long line of Hollywood blacklist melodramas is Trumbo, directed by Jay Roach. Best known for bringing us the Austin Powers trilogy, Roach … Continue reading

Life May Be.

Mark Cousins gave a lecture on the art of the video essay during my time at Edinburgh University. The director and film buff extraordinaire is probably most well known for his Channel 4 documentary The Story of Film. Last year he delighted us again with A Story of Children and Film; another cinematic essay which studied … Continue reading

Steve Jobs.

Have you ever been told an honest or depressing story you wish you could “un-hear”? That’s what it feels like to watch Steve Jobs. Divided up into three dramatic acts, Steve Jobs takes place in the final minutes before three different product launches. In each sequence we meet technology mogul Steve Jobs at different points in … Continue reading

This Boy’s Life.

  Based on the life and memoir of writer Tobias Wolff, This Boy’s Life captures the frustrations of childhood and the trust we place in our elders to protect us until we’re capable of doing it for ourselves. We first meet the young Toby on the run with his mother. Escaping her latest abusive boyfriend, the … Continue reading

Last Days.

I mean, talk about a yawn-fest. Last Days is one of the most dull and uninteresting films I have ever seen. I’m familiar with Van Sant’s style so I was prepared for long scenes of “not much really happening” but Last Days takes this to an unbearable level. This is Gus Van Sant’s depiction of the final days of … Continue reading