How to Talk to Girls at Parties.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties.

Based on the Neil Gaiman’s graphic short, How to Talk to Girls at Parties has been adapted to the screen by American indie and underground favourite, John Cameron Mitchell. Probably best known for his stunning and surreal debut feature, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Mitchell seems out of place to direct a film based around a group of teenage … Continue reading

Blade Runner 2049.

Blade Runner 2049.

Nobody with a Blade Runner tattoo on his or her ankle goes into Blade Runner 2049 feeling completely at ease. Two such people, my partner and I, entered a packed screening, thirty-five years after Ridley Scott’s original film was released. Here, a visionary hands over the sequel to Director Denis Villeneuve, who has built up … Continue reading

Colossal.

Colossal.

Booted out of her New York apartment by her exasperated partner, Gloria finds herself back in her childhood town, sleeping on the floor of her now empty family home. Having been out of work for over a year Gloria’s life has become a toxic cycle of heavy late night drinking and sleeping through the day … Continue reading

Alien: Covenant.

Alien: Covenant.

Alien is undoubtedly a near-perfect film which continues to dazzle and impress me each time I return to it. Ridley Scott’s bold aesthetic choices and simplistic approach to both the film’s story and visuals results in something altogether cinematically extraordinary. Although many believe an argument can be made for James Cameron’s Aliens, I see little greatness … Continue reading

Arrival.

Sequels and remakes dominate our cinemas, with the likes of Harry Potter, Captain America and James Bond returning again and again for their guaranteed financial success. Sequels start to worry me once we venture outside of the franchise format. With Ridley Scott’s Prometheus having lacked the charm and intelligence of Alien, the announcement of Blade … Continue reading

The Lobster.

Following the end of his marriage, a new singleton checks into a hotel; a hotel located somewhere between Anderson’s The Grand Budapest and Kubrick’s nightmarish The Overlook. The Lobster welcomes us into a surreal dystopian world in which all individuals are forced to aspire to become part of a couple. David’s twelve year marriage has ended … Continue reading