BlacKkKlansman

BlacKkKlansman

Spike Lee’s latest, loosely based on the early career of police-officer Ron Stallworth, opens with an icon scene from 1939’s Gone With the Wind. An iconic moment in American cinema, a distressed Scarlett O’Hara is wading through a sea of injured civil war soldiers. The camera gradually draws out, revealing the vast extent of the wounded. … Continue reading

You Were Never Really Here.

You Were Never Really Here.

United once again with astounding composer Jonny Greenwood (of Radiohead), director Lynne Ramsay returns with You Were Never Really Here, a murky tale of regret, revenge and redemption. Despite being temporarily attached to several projects, this is Ramsay’s first time in the director’s chair in six years, following up her astonishing adaptation of Lionel Shriver’s novel We … Continue reading

The Snowman.

The Snowman.

Michael Fassbender’s Harry Hole is something of a mosaic of all the cliched film noir detectives that cinema has constructed and brought to our screens in the last century. Isolated by his alcoholism, he longs for a new case he can sink his teeth into; to distract him from his lost love and lonely existence. … Continue reading

mother!

mother!

Cinema is full of unwelcome guests and domestic intruders, from that unexpected knock on the door to the uncomfortable sense of anxiety caused by someone overstaying their welcome. Michael Haneke’s Funny Games is perhaps the most obvious example of this; two young men dressed in white enquiring about borrowing some eggs but who possess much … Continue reading

Mulholland Drive.

Mulholland Drive.

The first time I saw Mulholland Drive was on a dim laptop screen in the back of a caravan. Even in this least cinematic of locations I found myself intoxicated by David Lynch’s chaotic meditation on the putrid nature of Hollywood. This weekend I finally saw it for the second time on a much larger screen as … Continue reading

Get Out.

Get Out.

Jordan Peele’s striking debut is a near perfect, satirical thriller. A chilling and enticing story which plays on American racial dynamics, Get Out is a smart, unique, mainstream cinema experience – a rare delight. In a theatrical world dominated by sequels and remakes, original storytelling is becoming more and more of a precious treat. Films … Continue reading

Elle.

Elle.

From Starship Troopers to Showgirls, Paul Verhoeven has always been a provocative boundary pusher. He’s a Director who’s used satirical cinema to challenge his audience and has always provoked a reaction. His back-catalogue is a chaotic and versatile bag of contradictions and in many ways Elle is no different. When Michelle, the successful co-founder of … Continue reading

Split.

Split.

Split is by no means the worst film M. Night Shyamalan has ever made but that’s hardly saying something. As dumb and eccentric as one would expect, Split centres around three teenage girls kidnapped by Kevin, a man with 23 separate personalities. Confined to a windowless room in a mysterious underground lair with seemingly endless … Continue reading

Imperium.

From Donny Brasco to Point Break, there is something totally intoxicating about undercover cop movies. Director Daniel Ragussis’s feature debut centres around such activity. The plot:  young and lonely FBI desk worker Nate Foster is asked to go undercover to infiltrate several neo-nazi organisations to determine and confirm their potential terrorist activities. Imperium shares many … Continue reading